This, too, is America: Burlington Route edition

I’m on the California Zephyr, on my way home from Denver, and the big stories back home are about the continuing lack of Silverliner Vs, and the announcement by Vice President Joe Biden that the Federal Government will be providing $2.45 billion in loans to Amtrak for the next generation of high speed trains on the Northeast Corridor.  Since I saw plenty of Silverliner Vs running merrily along at Denver Union Station on RTD’s A and B lines, and conventional-speed transcontinental trains are both close cousins and as far from sleek, Pendolino-derived HSTs as you can get, I’ve definitely been feeling this weekend as though I’ve been looking at American passenger railroading through a glass, darkly.

The Acela Express has the dubious distinction of having been such a success that it removed fast train travel in the Northeast from the reach of many ordinary people, since even the Northeast Regional trains that are meant to hold the middle of the market are regularly bid up to the sky and/or sold out.  The Avelia Liberty trainsets, which will be the successor to the original Acelas, are going to be an attempt to implement the aphorism that “the main problems with Amtrak can be solved with more Amtrak”.  28 trainsets (a 40% increase), and 9 passenger cars per trainset (a 50% increase), will result in a doubling of availability for high-margin HST seats.  That will give Amtrak some breathing room to continue making money on the Northeast Corridor, although it may suffer from a lack of ambition (9 cars is barely into the range of respectable length by international standards, but will still require expensive alterations to Amtrak maintenance facilities in Boston).  The tractive power on these new trains will be capable of 165 mph, with ambiguous mention of upgradability beyond that (although that might have been marketing targeted at the California High Speed Rail Authority), but the real trip time improvements will come from replacing the Acela’s “flying bank vault” design, and bespoke tilting mechanism, with mature European designs for both crashworthiness and tilting.  The key to going fast will be not going so slow.

Speaking of going “slow”, my current location obviously indicates that I have no intrinsic problem with it.  Conventional trains, whether day or sleeper, have their place, and will continue to do so even after true HSR begins to roll out across the country.  But this trip has been a painful reminder of American national priorities.  Crossing Iowa on the ex-CB&Q, much of the trip is within sight of US 34, a four lane divided highway with virtually no traffic.  Also frequently in sight is “Old Hwy 34”, a two-lane strip of battered concrete that is nevertheless <em>entirely adequate</em> to handle the observed traffic on both roads, or would be with proper maintenance.  Meanwhile, there is plenty of slack intermodal capacity on the railroad, something easily deduced from the evidence that Amtrak is suddenly and consistently running on time or early, both on 5/6 and nationwide.  That’s always a morbid sign that freight traffic is down significantly, in this case from the Death of Coal.

BNSF’s track department really needs to work on their switch installations.  Every one we went over west of Galesburg felt like a cannon shot fired into the bottom of the train.

I still want my 200+ mph HSR from Chicago to Omaha via the Quad Cities and Des Moines.  That’s where the population is, that’s where the travel markets are.  No offense to the CB&Q, BNSF, or the few, but proud, residents of southern Iowa.  And being able to make the Chicago-Omaha hop in 3 or 4 hours instead of 9 or 10 would be game-changing, including for those continuing to Denver or points west.  As amazing a time as I had in Denver, I don’t think it’s worth it to build HSR from there going either east or west to replace the current conventional service, although a north/south corridor along the Front Range would be promising.

The Silverliner V crisis continues; the latest measure will be express buses from select stations, to relieve pressure on crowded trains after Labor Day weekend.

Advanced tips for how to get in and out of Center City during the SEPTApocalypse: Glenside Combined

After two days of travel woes due to the Silverliner V crisis, some patterns have been established in terms of where the worst delays are, and how best to avoid them.  This series will be a listing of the best strategies to avoid the worst.

These will all assume an origin or destination in or beyond Center City Philadelphia. Directions will be for inbound travel, and will be reversible unless noted.  There will be some assumption made that money is available to exchange for time and/or comfort.

Generic inbound

If you are one of many standees on your train at Fern Rock, change there for the Broad Street Line.  Silverliner IVs are not designed for more than one or two standees, and there will be major delays in offloading at Temple University (at least) if you remain on board.  This will keep you safer, and will keep the system from melting down (further).  This instruction does not work in reverse; outbound trains may skip Fern Rock unannounced.

Glenside

Take the 22 bus on Easton Road.  It will be more crowded than usual since it’s one of the best alternatives for the beleaguered Warminster Line, but there hasn’t been a major reported increase in ridership yet, so you should ultimately be fine.  Change at Olney TC for the Broad Street Line.

Jenkintown

Take the 55 bus on Old York Road.  Change at Olney for the Broad Street Line.

Elkins Park, Melrose Park

Take the 55 to Olney, or the 28 or 70 bus to Fern Rock TC.

Fern Rock TC

Do not attempt to board an inbound RRD train here.  If you drive here, please consider carpooling; parking is massively overstretched.

Wayne Junction

Do not attempt to board an inbound RRD train here.  If you use Wayne Junction as a transfer point, consider using a bus route such as the 26 or the 77 to move circumferentially between branches at farther outlying stations.  All of the surface transit routes that directly serve Wayne Junction (23, 53, 75) connect to the Broad Street Line.

Advanced tips for how to get in and out of Center City during the SEPTApocalypse: Manayunk-Norristown Line

After two days of travel woes due to the Silverliner V crisis, some patterns have been established in terms of where the worst delays are, and how best to avoid them.  This series will be a listing of the best strategies to avoid the worst.

These will all assume an origin or destination in or beyond Center City Philadelphia. Directions will be for inbound travel, and will be reversible unless noted.  There will be some assumption made that money is available to exchange for time and/or comfort.

Norristown

Take the NHSL, take the NHSL, take the NHSL.  This is not hard.  Why are people still trying to take Regional Rail here whyyyyyyyyyy….

Conshohocken

Many options from here.  Take the train back one stop to Norristown for the NHSL.  Take the 95 bus to Gulph Mills for the NHSL, 124, or 125.  If you drive here, drive instead to Plymouth Meeting Mall for the 27 bus to Center City, or the L bus to Chestnut Hill.

Manayunk

Take the 61 bus.  You can stay on, or change to the 9/27/62/124/125 at Wissahickon, or change to a crosstown at 33rd/Dauphin Loop for the BSL, or change directly to the BSL at Fairmount.

Wissahickon

Another case of “you have such good options, why would you even try?”  The 9, 27, and 62 are Expressway buses; the 124 and 125 also take the Expressway but are premium-service routes, so have your Zone 2 Trailpass ready (and be kind about leaving seats in the outbound direction for those continuing on to King of Prussia).  All the buses other than the 9 and 27 stop at Wissahickon TC, a short walk down the hill from Wissahickon RR station.

East Falls

Give up, take the bus.  Best option if you can get there is to walk down to 33rd/Allegheny for the 60, but the 1 or R to Hunting Park Station BSL, or the 61 down Ridge, are also good choices, so choose depending on where in the neighborhood you are.

Allegheny

Please re-evaluate whether whatever reason you have for not taking the 33 or the 60 is really still applicable.

Advanced tips for how to get in and out of Center City during the SEPTApocalypse: Media-Elwyn Line

After two days of travel woes due to the Silverliner V crisis, some patterns have been established in terms of where the worst delays are, and how best to avoid them.  This series will be a listing of the best strategies to avoid the worst.

These will all assume an origin or destination in or beyond Center City Philadelphia. Directions will be for inbound travel, and will be reversible unless noted.  There will be some assumption made that money is available to exchange for time and/or comfort.

Wallingford and west

Stations west of Swarthmore are already being bustituted for the Crum Creek Viaduct replacement project; the reduction in trains to Swarthmore is just heaping one tribulation on another.  If the prospect of a shuttle bus to an overcrowded train does not appeal, the 101 trolley is the best alternative. The trolley can be reached on foot on State Street from Media or Moylan-Rose Valley, or driven to at Springfield Mall, the most underrated park-and-ride in SEPTAland even in the best of times.

The 111 express bus is another underrated alternative for Elwyn riders, but the best place to park-and-ride for it was Granite Run Mall, and having not been there since the mall was closed and demolished, I cannot give good advice as to how to ride it.

Swarthmore

The 109 bus is a decent option in its own right for reaching 69th Street, or it can be used to connect to the 101 at Springfield Mall, or the 102 at Baltimore Avenue in Clifton Heights.  Be aware that the buses stop on the south side of the mall, and the trolleys stop at the northeast corner of the property.

Clifton-Aldan through Morton

Switching to the 102 at Clifton-Aldan is not the fastest strategy, but if your train is dangerously crowded, it’s not the worst idea.  From Clifton-Aldan itself, it might be a superior option just on wait time.

Inner stations

Lansdowne has three bus options (109 to 69th Street, 113 to 69th Street, 113 to Darby TC), one of which should be approaching at any given time.  Fernwood-Yeadon has the 108, again in both directions, and eastern parts of Yeadon borough may be walkable to subway-surface trolleys 34, 13, or 11.  If you are one of the few dozen non-reverse-commute riders from Angora and 49th Street, congratulations on finding my blog, it’s an honor to have such a rare visitor as yourself, now please take the 34 or 13 trolley, respectively.  Unless you need level-boarding for accessibility reasons from 49th, in which case, take the 64 bus to 46th Street Station MFL, which is inconvenient but will at least physically allow you on board.

Advanced tips for how to get in and out of Center City during the SEPTApocalypse: Paoli-Thorndale Line

After two days of travel woes due to the Silverliner V crisis, some patterns have been established in terms of where the worst delays are, and how best to avoid them.  This series will be a listing of the best strategies to avoid the worst.

These will all assume an origin or destination in or beyond Center City Philadelphia. Directions will be for inbound travel, and will be reversible unless noted.  There will be some assumption made that money is available to exchange for time and/or comfort.

Outer Main Line

Amtrak’s Keystone Service is already the best bet from Paoli, Exton, or Downingtown, but if you are within walking distance of Malvern, Whitford, or Thorndale, you can use SEPTA for local travel to an Amtrak station, and catch America’s Railroad for the trip in.  This is actually best for outbound trips in the evening, which are exhibiting greater peakiness of crowding and delays.

West Chester residents used to driving to Exton to catch the train there might want to instead take the 104 bus from Downtown West Chester to 69th Street.

Middle Main Line

Daylesford, Devon, and Berwyn riders might consider a wrong-way trip to Paoli to pick up Amtrak there.  Otherwise, riders from east of Paoli and west of the Blue Route should consider taking the train to Radnor or Villanova, getting off there, and walking to the NHSL stations of the same names.  Take the NHSL in from there to 69th Street for the El into Center City.

Inner Main Line

As surface transit options proliferate with proximity to Philadelphia, the optimal alternative changes rapidly.  For Bryn Mawr and Haverford, I would suggest the 20 minute walk to the NHSL.  At Ardmore, Amtrak is making extra stops, but I recommend the 103 bus to Ardmore Junction instead, fulfilling its traditional role from its origin as a Red Arrow trolley.  In Narberth, the 44 bus to Center City  is likely the best.  And in Overbrook, the walk to 63rd and Malvern for the 10 trolley is far better than fighting through the crowds on the train.

The Silverliner V fleet is grounded. How you can avoid the mess.

SEPTA Silverliner V #807 boarding at Temple University Station.
A SEPTA Silverliner V in happier times. All 120 cars in the class have been withdrawn from service. By O484~enwiki (Own work) [CC BY-SA 4.0], via Wikimedia Commons
A defect in the trucks of the SEPTA Silverliner V has rendered 120 cars of the Regional Rail fleet inoperable until replacement parts can be fabricated and repairs can be made, a process which is expected to take the rest of the summer.  With approximately 1/3 of the fleet illegal to run, SEPTA Regional Rail will be on an enhanced Saturday schedule until further notice.  Complete schedules are posted on SEPTA’s website.

In order to make up the deficit of ~13,000 seats, SEPTA (and perhaps other agencies TBA) are laying on alternative services to try to avoid a complete rush hour meltdown.  As of now, SEPTA has already extended rush hour service levels on the Market-Frankford and Broad Street Lines, the cancellation of the Subway-Surface Trolley Tunnel maintenance blitz, additional service on the Norristown High Speed Line and Media and Sharon Hill trolleys, and has additional buses on standby to augment service.

So what should the savvy commuter do in these circumstances?

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SEPTA’s Trainview status board as of 8:40 AM, July 5th, as screen-captured by scotty269 on the railroad.net forums

1. Leave early, stay late, travel off-peak.

No matter what, peak capacity is going to be slammed.  Everything is taking longer than normal to get from A to B.  Take this into account, and also be aware that there will be both unexpected delays to published transit schedules, as well as extra transit service on little to no notice.  Allow plenty of time for everything, and stay connected to service alerts.  Off-peak trains seem to be running reasonably uncrowded, so if you can shift your travel plans, do so.  I expect happy hours across Center City to be well-patronized.

2. Other transit services are your friend.

If you have the option of taking an alternate service into or out of Center City at peak hours in the peak direction, whether that’s Amtrak from Chester County, the NHSL from Norristown or the Main Line, a suburban trolley from Delaware County, or a CTD bus from large swathes of Northwest Philadelphia, Northeast Philadelphia and Cheltenham and Abington Townships, please do so.  Not only will you make your own trip far more comfortable, but you will free up a seat (or one quarter of a square meter of standing room floor) for someone who may not have an alternative.  We are all in this together, and we can only get through by working together.  (Speaking of which, Amtrak needs to get it together as to whether or not it’s cross-honoring SEPTA passes on the Keystones.  They should, but they also need to be consistent.)  The least-crowded alternative service is the Broad Street Line from Fern Rock and Olney Transportation Centers.

3. Carpool, casually or otherwise.

SEPTA has opened up additional parking lots near the Sports Complex and has suspended parking fees at Frankford TC’s garage, and opened up additional parking in other locations, but a few hundred parking spaces isn’t going to do much in the face of a few thousand missing railroad seats.  If you must drive in, please try to bring along a few other people from your area.  Casual carpools, a/k/a “slug lines“, have yet to spring up in the absence of HOV restrictions on local highways, but are a good solution to the coordination problem of inadequate transit; if anyone hears of one setting up, or wants to start one, tell me and I will signal-boost it.

4. Lyft and Uber are still taxis.  Use them accordingly.

Taking an e-hail taxi into the city is not a systemic solution to the crisis, although it might be the one-off solution to making an important appointment on-time when transit is running very late.  Do consider them for bridging the gap to alternate services, especially in the suburbs, e.g. from Montgomery Avenue in Ardmore, to Ardmore Avenue Station on the NHSL, if the 103 bus isn’t practical; or from Malvern (where Amtrak doesn’t stop) to Paoli (where it does).  Uber’s cross-promotion with SEPTA, offering 40% discounts on Uber rides to or from 11 selected Regional Rail parking lots, is still good even if you board a bus afterwards instead of a train.

5. Don’t take your frustration out on SEPTA.

SEPTA unquestionably did the right thing in taking the Silverliner Vs out of service.  The defective part can fail catastrophically, causing a derailment, and nobody wants that to happen on a crowded train.  Whether they did the right thing in buying them from Hyundai Rotem in the first place is a long story and controversial subject, but everybody involved in that decision has since retired, so the beleaguered conductor or customer service rep isn’t responsible (and isn’t in a position to fix it now).  So take a deep breath, and save your anger for a worthier target.

STRIKE WATCH: NJ Transit Rail Operations

Conditions are favorable for the development of negotiation breakdown capable of producing a strike. If deadlock has either produced a strike or radar has indicated intense walkout activity, then a Strike Warning will be issued.

All 17 unions representing workers at NJ Transit Rail may either strike or be locked out beginning at 0:01 on Sunday, March 13th.  A second Presidential Emergency Board (PEB) cooling-off period expires on that day, leaving both labor and management free to pursue “self-help”.  The unions have been working without a contract since 2010.  NJT, and its political masters in the Christie Administration, have been steadfast in their rejection of the union’s proposals and the two PEBs’ arbitration, so the likelihood of a work stoppage is high.

NJT bus and light rail lines are separate divisions of NJT and will continue running.

The direct effects of a strike on the Philadelphia area will be somewhat low.  The 554 bus will run extra trips between Atlantic City and Lindenwold, and PATCO has agreed to cross-honor NJT fares between Lindenwold and Philadelphia.

However, the New York/North Jersey area anticipates being unable to replace NJT Rail’s capacity.  This will impact Greater Philadelphia-New York supercommuters, including those who take SEPTA or NJT’s River Line to Trenton, and those who drive to Hamilton or Princeton Junction.  NJT’s contingency plan, announced at a press conference this morning, includes 40,000 additional seats into New York on buses, ferries, and PATH, but the state-operated rail lines carry 105,000 into Gotham every day.

The removal of NJT service would result in a meltdown of North Jersey’s transportation networks, to a degree being described in apocalyptic terms.

In the event of a service interruption, selected regular NJT and private bus routes will see increased service.  Additionally, five temporary park-and-ride routes will operate, including Hamilton Station-Newark Penn and Metropark Station-Harrison PATH.  Rail tickets will be cross-honored on buses, light rail, PATH, and ferries.

While the official advice is to carpool, whether to the official park-and-rides or all the way in, neither NJDOT, nor the Port Authority of NY & NJ, nor the NJ Turnpike Authority, has committed to HOV restrictions in the event of a service interruption. This blog considers the failure to do so to be completely insane.

There are, as of yet, no designated park-and-ride locations on Staten Island in the contingency plan.

Highway traffic in North Jersey is expected to come to a standstill on all major roads inside the I-287 beltway.  Through-traffic between New England (excluding Fairfield County, CT) and Pennsylvania should divert to a route across the Hudson no farther south than I-84.  Traffic to NYC suburbs should cross no further south than the Tappan Zee, if at all possible.  Routes using I-287 itself may be unreliable as well.